Blueberry soup

IMG_4099

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recipe in English & German / Deutsches Rezept am Ende

The blueberry season draws to a close and these last berries are ripe, beautifully sunshine-sweet and laden with the floral, heathery taste of their smaller wild relatives from the woods. The best thing to do with these is to make blueberry soup.

A traditional Swedish (& Finnish & Danish) dish, this cold fruit soup, is on the thin side and rather fruity than sweet, which I prefer (add more sugar to taste, if you need to bolster the sweetness of your blueberries). Best know in our house as the soup that Emil of Lönneberga (Michel in Germany) lands in face first after crashing on stilts through a window and then pouring the rest over the fainted hostess Fru Petrell. Maybe, as a child you had a similar crush on idyllic Swedish country life from getting carried away by Astrid Lindgren’s books and the wonderful 1960s TV series and craved rolling out Pepparkakor (and gliding on brushes through the kitchen) with Pippi Langstrumpf (Pippi Longstockings) or taking part in the preparations for a Katthult feast. Then this is for you & me.

Albeit its nostalgic charm, blueberry soup is a delicious light pudding (dessert) or summer lunch. The Scandinavian classic has no cream in it nor is it pureed but is an intensely blueberry flavoured dark purple fluid with soft little berries floating in it. On your plate, maybe a dollop of cream might be added. My Mum used to make a similar dish that most Germans know as Kaltschale (a quick wikipedia look says: the Swedish know Kallskål & Danish Koldskål) and could be made from any fruit or berry mixes. Though I have a soft spot for childhood favourites and nostalgic nursery food but this perfumed berry soup has the power to conjure up that feeling of endless summertime holidays by the tablespoon.

Blueberry soup

How about some Korvapuusti – Finnish cardamom & cinnamon sugar buns on the side?


Blueberry soup

Adapted from Das Astrid Lindgren Kochbuch by Mamke Schrag & Andreas Wagner

 

12 oz (350g) blueberries (frozen work well, too)
4 tablespoons (ca. 50g) caster sugar (more to taste)
3 ¼ cups water
1 ½ teaspoon cornflour (corn starch in the US)

In a small saucepan, heat blueberries, sugar and water. Dissolve the cornstarch in a little cold water and add to the soup shortly before it is starting to boil. Cook while stirring for at least 1 minute, switch off the heat and continue to stir the soup for 3 more minutes. Leave to cool and keep until you are ready to serve in the fridge.

 

Blueberry soup


Blaubeersuppe

Adaptiert von Mamke Schrag & Andreas Wagner: Das Astrid Lindgren Kochbuch

 

350g Blaubeeren (ersatzweise auch gefrorene Beeren)
4 EL (ca. 50g) Zucker (mehr nach Geschmack)
¾ l Wasser
½ EL Speisestärke

Blaubeeren, Zucker und Wasser in einem kleinen Topf erhitzen. Speisestärke mit ein wenig kaltem Wasser verrühren und kurz bevor die Suppe zu kochen beginnt hinzugeben. Unter Rühren für mindestens 1 Minute kochen, dann die Platte ausschalten und die Suppe für weitere 3 Minuten umrühren. Kalt werden lassen und anschließend bis zum Servieren im Kühlschrank aufbewahren.

 

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Blueberry soup

  1. Hello!

    My name is Emelie and I have read your blog and I really liked your recipes! I work for a website called myTaste.com and I would love for you to join us!

    http://www.mytaste.com is a search engine that collects food blogs. We already have over 4000 blogs and if you join us you will take benefit from the traffic that we are sending to your blog.

    Add our widget and hopefully with your recipes your blog will be on the top of the food blogs list!

    If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact me at info@mytaste.com

    To join myTaste, just go to http://www.mytaste.com/add-your-food-blog

    Best regards, Emelie
    mytaste.com

    • Hi Traci, you should definitely try this one and thank you! It really is a soup (is there a greater summer lunch? or pudding?) and to me eternally connected to Astrid Lindgren’s stories. N.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s